1992 SUZUKI GSX-R 750 Motorcycle $2495

Year: 1992
Make: Suzuki
Model: GSX-R750
Mileage: 25,000
Class: Cruiser/Sport/Street
Color: White/Black/Red

Price: $2,495

Description: Quick, Piped and Jetted!

Come see this one today!

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Suzuki GSX-R750 is a family of 750 cc sports motorcycles from Suzuki’s GSX-R series of motorcycles. Looking like a Suzuki Endurance racer, it can be considered to be the first affordable, modern racer-replica suitable for road use. It was introduced at the Cologne Motorcycle Show in October 1984.

The air and oil cooled models can be divided into the first generation and second generation, colloquially referred to as ‘slabbies’ and ‘slingshots’ respectively. The 1985-1987 models featured very flat bodies compared to modern sport-bikes, hence the term ‘slab-sided’. The 1988-1991 (1992 USA) models are sometimes referred to as slingshots because the carburetors introduced in 1988 were marketed as slingshot carburetors (slingshot describes the cross section of the semi-flat slide carbs).

GSX-R750 (M) 1991
The ’91 GSX-R750M gained 15 kg over the previous model. The most notable feature of the “M” are the faired in headlamps and a slanted nose, both of which were designed to reduce drag. Also fitted was a new larger seat and new rear body work that featured twin tail lamps. This was the last GSX-R to use the oil-cooled SACS engine (except for US).

Internal engine changes included a new valvetrain that used one dedicated cam lobe and rocker arm (finger follower) per valve (previous models used one lobe and one forked rocker per two valves). Valve clearance (lash) was now adjusted with shims (previous models used a screw and nut). The cam duration and indexing changed slightly as well as the porting according to a magazine article. The rear tyre width was increased to a 170 mm section width. The gauges also changed to white coloured needles (previously amber coloured).

GSX-R750 (N) 1992
1992 US models are the same as the 1991 with different paint and graphics. All other markets got the new water-cooled GSX-R 750.

GSX-R750 (WN) 1992
New water-cooled engine and revised frame, bodywork and suspension. USA market models retained the oil-cooled engine and the USA 1992 model is basically the same as the 91 model with different graphics. A sleeved down version was available as the GSXR-600 for 92 and 93, both years were available with inverted forks. Interestingly, the 1992 GSXR-600 was water-cooled for the US market while the 750 had to wait one more year.

HISTORY

In 1909, Michio Suzuki (1887–1982) founded the Suzuki Loom Works in the small seacoast village of Hamamatsu, Japan. Business boomed as Suzuki built weaving looms for Japan’s giant silk industry. In 1929, Michio Suzuki invented a new type of weaving machine, which was exported overseas. The company’s first 30 years focused on the development and production of these machines.

Despite the success of his looms, Suzuki believed that his company would benefit from diversification and he began to look at other products. Based on consumer demand, he decided that building a small car would be the most practical new venture. The project began in 1937, and within two years Suzuki had completed several compact prototype cars. These first Suzuki motor vehicles were powered by a then-innovative, liquid-cooled, four-stroke, four-cylinder engine. It had a cast aluminum crankcase and gearbox and generated 13 horsepower (9.7 kW) from a displacement of less than 800cc.

With the onset of World War II, production plans for Suzuki’s new vehicles were halted when the government declared civilian passenger cars a “non-essential commodity.” At the conclusion of the war, Suzuki went back to producing looms. Loom production was given a boost when the U.S. government approved the shipping of cotton to Japan. Suzuki’s fortunes brightened as orders began to increase from domestic textile manufacturers. But the joy was short-lived as the cotton market collapsed in 1951.

Faced with this colossal challenge, Suzuki’s returned to the production of motor vehicles. After the war, the Japanese had a great need for affordable, reliable personal transportation. A number of firms began offering “clip-on” gas-powered engines that could be attached to the typical bicycle. Suzuki’s first two-wheeled vehicle was a bicycle fitted with a motor called, the “Power Free.” Designed to be inexpensive and simple to build and maintain, the 1952 Power Free had a 36 cc, one horsepower, two-stroke engine.

The new double-sprocket gear system enabled the rider to either pedal with the engine assisting, pedal without engine assist, or simply disconnect the pedals and run on engine power alone. The patent office of the new democratic government granted Suzuki a financial subsidy to continue research in motorcycle engineering.

By 1954, Suzuki was producing 6,000 motorcycles per month and had officially changed its name to Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd. Following the success of its first motorcycles, Suzuki created an even more successful automobile: the 1955 Suzuki Suzulight. The Suzulight sold with front-wheel drive, four-wheel independent suspension and rack-and-pinion steering, which were not common on cars until three decades later.

Volkswagen AG completed the purchase of 19.9% of Suzuki Motor Corporation’s issued shares on 15 January 2010, Volkswagen AG is the biggest shareholder in Suzuki.

Leadership

The company was founded by Michio Suzuki; its current Chairman and CEO is Osamu Suzuki. the fourth mukoyōshi in a row to run the company.

Timeline

The Suzuki Loom Company started in 1909 as a manufacturer of looms for weaving silk and cotton. Michio Suzuki was intent on making better, more user-friendly looms and, for 30 years his focus was on the development of these machines. Michio’s desire to diversify into automotive products was interrupted by World War II. Before it began building four-stroke engines, Suzuki Motor Corp. was known for its two-stroke engines (for motorcycles and autos).

After the war, Suzuki made a two-stroke motorized bicycle, but eventually the company would be known for Hayabusa and GSX-R motorcycles, for the QuadRunner, and for dominating racetracks around the world. Even after producing its first car in 1955 the company didn’t have an automobile division until 1961. Today Suzuki is among the world’s largest automakers, and a major brand name in important markets, including Japan and India, but no longer sells cars in North America.

Suzuki Motor Corporation (Japanese: スズキ株式会社 Hepburn: Suzuki Kabushiki-Kaisha?) is a Japanese multinational corporation headquartered in Minami-ku, Hamamatsu, Japan, which specializes in manufacturing automobiles, four-wheel drive vehicles, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), outboard marine engines, wheelchairs and a variety of other small internal combustion engines.

In 2011, Suzuki was thought to be the tenth biggest automaker by production worldwide. Suzuki has over 45,000 employees worldwide and has about 35 main production facilities in 23 countries and 133 distributors in 192 countries.

Romanized name: Suzuki Kabushiki-Kaisha
Type: Public (K.K.)
Traded as TYO:7269
Industry: Automotive
Founded: 1909; 106 years ago (as Suzuki Loom Works)
Founder: Michio Suzuki
Headquarters: Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan
Area served: Worldwide
Key people: Osamu Suzuki, (Chairman & CEO)
Products: Automobiles, engines, motorcycles, ATVs, outboard motors
Production output: Increase 2,878,000 automobiles (FY2012) – Decrease 2,269,000

Motorcycles and ATVs (FY2012)

Revenue: Increase ¥2,578.3 billion (FY2012) (US$26.27 billion)
Profit: Increase ¥80.4 billion (FY2012) (US$819 million)
Total assets: Increase ¥2,487.6 billion (FY2012) (US$25.34 billion)
Owner: Volkswagen Group As of 15 January 2010 (19.9%)
Number of employees: Increase 14,405 (March 2013)

Subsidiaries

Maruti Suzuki
Magyar Suzuki
Pak Suzuki Motor
Suzuki Canada
American Suzuki Motor
Suzuki China
Suzuki GB PLC

Websites: www.globalsuzuki.com – www.suzuki.co.jp

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